Making Augmented Jack-o-Lanterns via Quiver ...

Making Augmented Jack-o-Lanterns via Quiver ...


When I was growing up I had to learn how to write out step by step instructions.  The best way my teacher had us learn was to write out the process in making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.  During the demonstration the person following our instructions could not do anything unless we said it and we couldn't say anything unless we wrote it out.  By the end you knew you where successful if the person following your instructions made a successful peanut butter and jelly sandwich.

When I saw Quiver's pumpkin carving augmented coloring page, I thought how fun would it be for kids to type up steps into creating a jack-o-lantern.  What tools would you need to carve a Jack-o-Lantern? How would you clean out the pumpkin seeds?  What would you do with the pumpkin seeds? How many seeds might be in their pumpkin?  What should they do first carve the pumpkin or clean it? How would they carve the pumpkin?  What shapes would they make?

If your class was doing a science or math experiment say in comparing a small pumpkin to a larger one and which one would have more seeds you could incorporate it into this augmented activity.  Better yet add it to your interactive student notebook.  While they are writing out their instructions you could have them include how many seeds they think would be in their pumpkin.  As a class you can then do ratio of seeds to pumpkins.  You could make a chart of the different shapes used when creating the Jack-o-Lanterns, how many Jack-o-Lanterns have teeth, sunglasses, etc..

After students have typed up their instructions, which I would use Google Docs for.  Create a QR Code that will redirect the viewers to the instructions and place the QR Code with each Jack-o-Lantern.  If using Google Docs you can either make the page shareable or make it view-able on the web.  I would make the instructions view-able on the web.  As a class you can decide which step of instructions might make a successful Jack-o-Lantern by voting or making persuasive speeches and try to follow the instructions to the letter on a real pumpkin.  For younger students I would have them read off the instructions while the teacher follows and does the carving.


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Augmenting the Ancient Times ....

Augmenting the Ancient Times ....


Have you ever thought about having students create a newspaper featuring news from ancient civilizations? There are several ways for students to create newspapers that can feature articles from the ancient civilizations.  SMORE an online digital Flyer, Magazine, and Newspaper creator is a great tool for students to use to create a digital newspaper or flyers. Using Blippar's Blipp Builder students or you can add digital content that the reader can interact with via the Blippar app.

For me augmented reality needs to be interactive.  If you are planning on linking the ancient newspaper or article to a single website or video then you should use a QR Code.  With Blippar you can add several different digital content to a single trigger. (An image or item you scan)  For example a couple of video clips, a few links to a websites, pictures, and an audio file, etc... can all be added to a single trigger. Make it interactive not just scannable.

There are other online creators that students can use to create their digital newspapers, articles, magazines, flyers, brochures, etc... No matter what the tool you have students use to create and show their learning just have a rubric for students.  Give them a clear idea on what you are looking for. You might to want to also talk about effort and what a quality piece of work looks like.

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Creating Fractions and Charts via Quiver...

Creating Fractions and Charts via Quiver...


Quiver's augmented coloring pages are so versatile which makes them possible to be used in writing, story problems, and even fractions and charts.  Because of the interactivity with Quiver's coloring pages students can record data to create fractions and charts.

I created this page for my students to record shooting practice in order to create a simple spreadsheet and chart.  There are so many chart making tools out there you will need to pick up that works best for you and your students.

My students will be using this page to record their data, sketch out their chart so when it is time to transfer their data to Google Sheets they will have an idea of what their Google chart should look like.

Having my students think their data as a fraction will help learn to read a chart.  Playing the shooting practice will help them stay engaged in collecting the data they will need in order to create a chart.

This page would work great in a student's math interactive notebook or in a center.  Before using this activity with your students you may want to go over how to collect data and writing out fractions.  You may also want to review different charts such as a bar chart verses a pie chart and when you each one.

Creating Fractions & Charts via Quiver app:




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Solving Word Problems via Quiver ....

Solving Word Problems via Quiver ....


Augmented coloring pages can go beyond just coloring.  They can be used to introduce a topic or concept, as a writing prompt, and solving word problems.  Using Quiver's coloring pages I created a few word problems.  These pages would be great to add to an math interactive notebook or used in a center.  You can turn almost all of Quiver's coloring pages into word problems.  I also wanted to take it a step further. I do not just want students to solve word problems but rather they create their own.  Using the augmented or the magic part of the coloring pages I ask students to come up with their own word problem and answer.

Before you have students writing their own word problems you may want to equip them with some useful mathematical terms such as twice as many, less than, etc... Using the Frayer model for common mathematical terms in students' ISN would be a great tool for students to refer to when writing their own word problems.

Have students interact with the magical augmented element of the coloring pages before they start to write their own word problems.  This will help inspire them as they think about what would be a good problem for others to solve.  After students have written their word problems have them share with other students to see if they could come up with the correct answer.


The Frayer Model: Fold horizontally and glue the bottom half
to the ISN page so that it makes a flap. I like to have students write
 the word on the top flap.  So they can quickly find the word
 and lift the flap for the definition and examples.


Word Problems via the Quiver app:




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