Create Your Own Pocket Monster via Quiver....

Create Your Own Pocket Monster via Quiver....


video


Pokémon Go has definitely has taken augmented reality into the mainstream.  Kids of all ages are being drawn in to play with the interactive game.  As I prepare for the next school year I can't but help to think about ways I can use Pokémon Go with my students.  Since I love augmented reality and love Quiver's Dot Day page I thought how cool it would be to design my own Pokémon via Quiver's Dot Day page.

Meet Brainy he is a very unique pocket monster.  When he is busy thinking his thoughts bubbles up and he lets them burst all around him.  He uses his thought bubbles to help others solve problems of all kinds.  Sometimes the thought bubbles help and other times they take others around him to magical places and they forget what they were working on.  Just depending on what Brainy is thinking about.

I used Quiver's Dot Day page and Google Draw to create Brainy and Brainy's Stats page.  Within Quiver's app you can record video clips.  Above is a little recording of Brainy in action. 

In your classroom you can challenge students to create their own pocket monsters.  They will need stats as well as a back story for each monster.  To bring the augmented world to those pocket monster I would have students create them using Quiver's Dot Day coloring sheet.  You can use any digital tools to create the pocket monsters stats.  Buncee would be tool to use.  Students could upload the picture of their monster. One monster per slide and add its stats.  Google Draw is another great tool to use.  There are tons out there pick the one you are most comfortable using or one that you want to learn how to use.  The call is yours.  


To learn ways that Pokémon Go has inspired me for my classroom visit Quiver's Blog.

Resources:




Augmented Art Show.... via Quiver

Augmented Art Show.... via Quiver

I love discovering new ways to use Quiver's Dot Day coloring page. As I was thinking about this week #AR4Learning Twitter chat it dawned on me.  Why not have an augmented art show.  The reason I picked to use the Dot Day coloring page by Quiver is that Quiver has built in a recording tool within the app.  Not just a camera feature but a video and or audio recorder.

My thought for this Augmented Art Show is to have students make their creation inside the Dot Day circle.  When they interact with their creation they can record it.  The can also record a selfie with their creation and explain what it is, why they created, what they used to create it, and etc...

Your recording saves to your camera roll.  From there you can share out the recordings into iMovie, Spark, SMORE, social media, and etc.. Quiver currently doesn't have a platform for you to create your own augmented content so you will would need to use Blippar or Aurasma to add the recording as the augmented content.  You could take a picture of the artist interacting with their creation via the Quiver app.  Take that picture and import it into the AR creation platform you use and use that as your trigger.  Then hang all of the pictures you took of the artists interacting with their creations next to their art work.  I would also post simple instructions on scanning the artist's pictures and the art work.  Talk about an art show being very interactive.  You wouldn't have to create your own augmented trigger, you could share the Quiver video on your favorite online platform (Class Facebook, Class Twitter, Class Instagram, Class website, and etc...)

What inspired me to want students to think about augmented art was the artist Leon Keer.  His amazing 3D street art one is just unbelievable and two he has added augmented content to it.  Talk about seeing art in a different perspective, not just art but everything.  I am always trying to find ways for my students to think but to look outside of the box.  Every creation starts with a spark, mark, dot, line, and imagination. I can't wait to see what kind of augmented art students start to create!


To learn more ways to use augmented reality in education join us every Thursday at 8pm central time on Twitter for #AR4Learning.






Using Creative Tools to Bring Writing to Life...

Using Creative Tools to Bring Writing to Life...

Since I teach keyboarding skills I use writing as my go to applying tool.  When I started teaching keyboarding skills it was like pulling teeth to get my students started.  They would whine a lot and ask: Well how long does it need to be, What do I need to put into it, Is a paragraph for you 3 sentences, and etc..  To get their creative juices flowing I would use a variety of tools.  The top two tools that really got my students started in writing just happen to be augmented triggers and 360 environments. I truly believe the tools get students up, moving, and engaged in the subject or area they are writing about.

Keep in mind when it comes to augmented reality content you should treat it as a tool, and it doesn't have to be the main focus of your lesson or activity.  Just like any tool it is there to enhance the learning experience, not to be the end all be all part of your lesson.

Since 360s are a very engaging tool I was beyond excited when Buncee made it possible for me to embed them into their platform.  Talk about personal learning! I can now create my own 360 environments and use them with my students.  You can also get 360s from Nearpod and Thinglink. When Thinglink 360s get out of beta testing you will be able to add resources and information to the 360s.  I can't wait for this feature.  Talk about making learning engaging.

The reason I really like Buncee's ability to add a 360 to a slide also allows me to add information around the 360. I can leave instructions, suggestions, questions, and etc.. with the 360.  Below is a #Whatif Field Trip activity I created. The idea of this activity is for students to use these slides in the augmented interactive writing journal. My idea is to print these slides off the size of a business card and have them adhere them to pages in their notebook along with Quiver's map coloring sheet the printed off in a 4x6 size.  I want my students to explore the 4 different areas and write about them.  My students will also have to do some research about them.  Then I want them to mark on their Quiver map where they think the different locations are.  I would have a map per place or one large one.  For me the map will be my assessment.  Did they find the general location of each place.  You will notice I did number each location so my students can just put the number on the map.  For the keyboarding part they will be making a SMORE of each place and include pictures of the augmented map.

I plan to use augmented journals for students to jot down their notes when research. I want to move into having them sketchnote as well.  (baby steps)




You will notice that the 1st location loaded differently.  That 360 is one I made with Bubbli of a zoo near by our town.  The other 360s I pulled in within Buncee.

Since I've been using augmented tools and 360s my students really do not whine about writing or ask me how long does it need to be.


Resources:



Join us every Thursday at 8pm central to learn more ways to use augmented reality tools in education. 






Q&A with @KatieAnn_76 - July 10th


Qand A with @KatieAnn_76 - July 10th


@KatieAnn_76 answer questions on the the topic of Augmented Reality in Education
Katie Ann answer questions from viewers and talks about why augmented triggers are not like QR Codes and her favorite augmented companies. Orginal audio taken from Periscope recording added to Let's Talk AR YouTube Channel.






Frequency: bi-weekly | Rating: TV-G | Location: Kansas
Author: Katie Ann Wilson
Email: tigerlovessmokey@gmail.com


video